World Listening Day 2018

Pauline Oliveros Listening all the timeYou hear all the time: how much do you listen? What do you listen to? What do you hear when you don’t think you’re listening?

Celebrate the memory of Pauline Oliveros with World Listening Day.

Take a walk. Walk so silently that the bottoms of your feet become ears.

Share what you’re listening to.

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Southbound

kingston kenI am bound for London — well, actually Kingston-on-Thames first for the conference. Never been to this campus before but it looks lovely. I’ll be near Hampton Court so I might finally go there. The Royal Horticulture Society had a big show there: the gardens are bound to be lovely.

Of course the conference ought to be a blast. I really get to enjoy it because I am the first speaker after the welcome! Heh, that makes a difference from going in the last panel of the last day. Far more relaxing. All the papers look interesting — after all, it’s Ken Russell!

I’ll be flying down which is a change. Rail tickets have gone up so much it was actually cheaper (not to mention quicker). Going by way of Surbiton which always puts me in mind of Monty Python.

I will have adventures to share, of course: at least a couple of concerts in London afterward, too. I will doubtless share my opinions here. In the meantime I’m just glad to have my paper finished well before time!

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Representing the skulk always!

Daphne Oram’s Wonderful World of Sound

Isobel McArthur as Daphne Oram

Photo via Dundee Rep

We had a chance to catch the Blood of the Young and Tron Theatre presentation of Daphne Oram’s Wonderful World of Sound at Dundee Rep. This show is touring Scotland, so if you can do be sure to see it. If you don’t know anything about Oram, there’s a good primer at her official website. You may recall that her book on sound theory An Individual Note was kickstarted last year, a project spearheaded by the fabulous Sarah Angliss.

Co-written by star Isobel McArthur (pictured above) and director Paul Brotherston, the play gives an overview of key moments in Oram’s life from her childhood interests in music in archeology, to the 1942 séance where the 17 year old was encouraged to pursue music instead of a more traditional ‘girl’s path’ to safety and suffocation. Sheer determination and unflagging confidence in the power of sound eventually brings her to co-founding and becoming director of the famed BBC Radiophonic Workshop. McArthur embodies Oram with an enthusiasm and a dogged primness that allows the passionate creative force to burst out to great effect when it’s been denied too long.

The ensemble cast Robin Hellier, David James Kirkwood, Dylan Read and Matthew Seager move adroitly between parts, shifting accents and body language to make transitions clear. Ana Inés Jabares-Pita has designed a set that supports that nimbleness of the cast. The true magic of theatre is creating places and people in an instant that you completely believe. A small ensemble can sometimes feel like Tommy Cooper changing hats. With a minimum of props, this group portrayed a succession of situations with vivid clarity.

The live sound score by Anneke Kampman was simply amazing. She created ambience, soaring melodies, a wide variety of sound effects and really brought the whole philosophy of Oram to aural life. You can follow her on SoundCloud to hear more, but if you can catch her live do. The frisson between the music and the players energised the whole audience.

You can get a taster here:

Sounding Out Medieval

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Have you ever wondered what the Middle Ages sounded like? I am obsessing over the idea lately, especially as it applies to magic. How wonderful then to be part of a series that has begun at Sounding Out, the Sound Studies blog. Thanks to the editors Dorothy Kim and Christopher Roman for putting together this fantastic collection.

I’m new to the discipline of Sound Studies. I have the ‘bible’ The Sound Studies Reader which I’m devouring. The presentation I gave at the Digital Britain Conference was my first tentative step in that direction and I got a lot of terrific experience working with Max Goldfarb on the ‘Home – Concept – Hudson’ piece.

See? You think I just do a bunch of weird stuff, but it all connects (at least in my head). I have so much to learn — which is so much fun!

Read the introduction here.

Read Chris’s piece on Richard Rolle here.

Coming soon:

“Playing the Medieval English Lyric” Dorothy Kim

“ ‘All their ioynts & properties’: Orthography and Sound in Early English Poetry” David Hadbawnik

“A Medieval Music Box: the Cantigas de Santa María as Sound Technology in the Age of Alfonso X” Marla Pagán-Mattos

“ ‘A Clateryng of Knokkes’: Multimodality and Performativity in ‘The Blacksmith’s Lament [VC1] ’” Katherine Jager

“The Sound of Magic” K.A. Laity

And there’s more — all the way into 2017! I have so much to learn, I can hardly wait.