Orkney: Ring of Brodgar

There’s nothing quite like these amazing old monuments, is there? Mary and Amy brought me by here the night I arrived in Orkney. I tried to take a picture in the moonlight but my camera wasn’t really up to it. But it was magical to be sure.

2013-10-23 16.34.43

“Because the interior of the Ring o’ Brodgar has never been fully excavated, or scientifically dated, the monument’s actual age remains uncertain. However, it is generally assumed to have been erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC”

2013-10-23 16.35.19

The wind was coming on strong and later would howl wildly around the house. It kept most of the tourists away, too.

2013-10-23 16.35.51

Mary waited in the car (since she’d been there many times already and it was really cold) so forgive the selfie; wondrous light though, eh?

2013-10-23 16.36.02

I don’t think I got a shot that showed the whole of the ring, but I love the light of this one.

2013-10-23 16.36.15

The individual stones are all so singular; many have cracked as the fierce winds batter them.

2013-10-23 16.36.55

They wear in fascinating ways.

2013-10-23 16.37.24

A few have fallen, or layers of the stones have split and fallen.

2013-10-23 16.37.55

The same slabs are used in construction all over the islands, but they are prone to splitting in this manner.

2013-10-23 16.38.34

But the glory of walking among them has a cost; there are jerks who still carve their stupid names on these stones that have stood millennia. Morons.

2013-10-23 16.39.08

Some destruction is natural, like this stone felled by lighting.

2013-10-23 16.40.13

The wind leaves its story on the stones’ surfaces.

2013-10-23 16.44.20

What can I say? The same word returns: magic.

7 thoughts on “Orkney: Ring of Brodgar

  1. I think sometimes that the fierce wind is one of the best parts of these old places. It gives them a singular vitality that rests on the deep base of their ancient power. Invigorating. Thanks, Kate.

Comments are closed.